Paleo Diet 101

You may have heard of the “paleo” diet. It was the world’s most popular diet in 2013. But what is it? Is it a fad? Is it right for you? Scientist and “Paleo Mom” Sarah Ballentyne, Ph.D. defines it as: “The Paleo diet is a nutrient-dense whole foods diet based on eating a variety of quality meat, seafood, eggs, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds.  It improves health by providing balanced and complete nutrition while avoiding most processed and refined foods and empty calories.” The name “paleo” is from the “paleolithic” time when earlier humans (thousands of years ago) were hunters and gatherers. It is thought to represent the era of nutrition before agriculture. What you can (and can’t) eat on the paleo diet Of course, being a “diet,” paleo has food guidelines. The paleo diet was created to increase the amount of whole, unprocessed, nutrient-dense foods; while reducing the number of gut-disrupting, hormone-disrupting, and inflammatory foods. But this doesn’t mean there are only a couple of foods to choose from! There is a pretty wide variety of food to choose from in the paleo diet. You can include fruits, vegetables, …

How Do I Keep My Blood Sugar Stable?

Oh, the words “blood sugar.” Does it conjure up visions of restrictive eating, diabetes medications, or insulin injections? Blood sugar is the measure of the amount of sugar in your blood. You need the right balance of sugar in your blood to fuel your brain and muscles. The thing is, it can fluctuate. A lot. This fluctuation is the natural balance between things that increase it; and things that decrease it. When you eat food with sugars or starches (“carbs”), then your digestive system absorbs sugar into your blood. When carbs are ingested and broken down into simple sugars, your body keeps blood sugar levels stable by secreting insulin. Insulin allows excess sugar to get it out of your bloodstream and into your muscle cells and other tissues for energy Why keep my blood sugar stable? Your body wants your blood sugar to be at an optimal level. It should be high enough, so you’re not light-headed, fatigued, and irritable. It should be low enough that your body isn’t scrambling to remove excess from the blood. When blood sugar is too low, this is referred to as “hypoglycemia.” When blood …

The Stress Mess: How It Messes With Your Health

We all have some level of stress, right? It may be temporary (acute), or long-term (chronic). Acute stress usually won’t mess with your health too much. It is your body’s natural reaction to circumstances and can even be life-saving. Then, when the “threat” (a.k.a. “stressor”) is gone, the reaction subsides, and all is well. It’s the chronic stress that’s a problem. You see, your body has specific stress reactions. If these stress reactions are triggered every day or many times a day that can mess with your health. Stress (and stress hormones) can have a huge impact on your health. Let’s dive into the “stress mess.” Mess #1 – Increased risk of heart disease and diabetes Why save the best for last? Anything that increases the risk for heart disease and diabetes (both serious, chronic conditions) needs to be discussed. Stress increased the risk for heart disease and diabetes by promoting chronic inflammation, affecting your blood “thickness,” as well as how well your cells respond to insulin. Mess #2 – Immunity Did you notice that you get sick more often when you’re stressed? Maybe you get colds, cold sores, or …

July Membership Interview – Michelle Hibbert – Wellness Travel

I am happy to present an amazing interview with you this month that involves wellness, traveling and having fun!  This month I interviewed wellness & adventure travel specialist, Michelle Hibbert of Wellness Adventures Worldwide.  Michelle is originally from England and explains how she begin traveling as a young child.  Her joy for fitness and travel led to creating a business that could help people be more physically active and/or heal and recuperate. She has successfully coordinated trips that involve high intensity workouts at major fitness resorts, to meditation and yoga retreats.  She has help many people travel to beautiful get-away in the U.S. as well as overseas.  In this interview we also dig into the major differences between how Europeans view wellness and vacation time versus people in the United States.  There is a fascinating distinction and Michelle and I have a lively discussion on the topic. Don’t miss this inspiring, energetic and motivating interview. Click here to join the membership or if you are already a member – log in to watch: http://buildbodywealth.com/become-a-member/ With this membership you will get new monthly content that includes: Interviews with other health professionals …

Reduce Inflammation With These Key Foods

Inflammation. It’s not just for health headlines. It’s a fact. Scientists are measuring levels of inflammation in our bodies and finding that it can be pretty bad for our health; this is especially true when it’s chronic (i.e. lasts a long time). Inflammation has been linked to obesity, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and diabetes, just to name a few. But, instead of writing all about what it is, how it’s measured, and where it comes from; why don’t I focus on some foods packed with anti-inflammatory antioxidants that are proven to help reduce it? Here are my top anti-inflammatory food recommendations: Anti-inflammatory Food #1: Berries, Grapes, and Cherries Why save the best for last? Perhaps the most amazingly delicious anti-inflammatory foods are a sweet favorite of yours? Berries, grapes, and cherries are packed with fiber, and antioxidant vitamins (e.g. vitamin C) and minerals (e.g. manganese). Oh, and did I forget to mention their phytochemicals (phyto=plant)? Yes, many antioxidants such as “anthocyanins” and “resveratrol” are found in these small and delicious fruits. In fact, berries, grapes, and cherries may be the best dietary sources of these amazingly healthy compounds. Anti-inflammatory Food #2: …

Adrenal Fatigue: What Is It?

Stressed? Tired? Craving sugar? Can’t sleep? All of these can be related to the constant stress we feel in our lives. We know that stress can have a huge impact on our health and wellness. And, since your adrenal glands produce stress hormones, adrenal fatigue (or “HPA Axis Dysregulation,”) is a popular theme lately. Your adrenal glands look like walnuts that live on top of both of your kidneys. These important glands produce many hormones, including stress hormones. But what happens when they become “overworked?” You’ve heard of “adrenaline junkies,” right? Adrenaline and cortisol are the stress hormones that give you the commonly known adrenaline rush; when you’re totally alert and living in the moment. This feeling is known as your body’s “fight or flight” response. Some people (perhaps you?) just love that intense feeling. The release of hormones in the fight or flight response is your body’s normal reaction to stress.  Stress can sometimes be positive, like when it helps you swerve and prevent a crash. After a short time, the fight or flight response dissipates, your body goes back to normal, and all is good. But what would …

The Coconut Oil Craze – Should I Jump on the Bandwagon Too?

Yes, you should (end of post). But what exactly is it about coconut oil that makes it so healthy? And which type is best? Let’s dive into some of the fascinating research and find out. Coconut oil is a special kind of fat Coconut oil is fat and contains the same 9 calories per gram as other fats. It is extracted from the “meat” of the coconut. Coconut oil is a white solid at room temperature and easily melts into a clear liquid on a hot day. The idea of adding coconut oil to your diet is NOT to add on to what you already eat but to substitute it for some of the (possibly) less healthy fats you may be eating now. And here’s why – Because not all calories or fats are created equal. Coconut oil contains a unique type of fat known as “Medium Chain Triglycerides” (MCTs). In fact, 65% of the fat in coconut oil are these MCTs. What makes MCTs unique is how your body metabolizes them; they’re easily absorbed into the bloodstream by your gut, where they go straight to the liver, and they’re …

How Can I Get Enough Vitamin D?

When we think of “vitamins,” we know they’re super-important for health. But vitamin D is special. It’s difficult to get enough vitamin D; vitamin D is, therefore, a very common deficiency. So, let’s talk about how much of this critical fat-soluble vitamin we need, and how you can get enough. The three ways to vitamin D are exposure to the sun, consuming vitamin D containing food, and through supplements. Why is vitamin D important, and how much do we need? Vitamin D helps us absorb calcium from our food and acts like a hormone to help us build strong bones. Vitamin D can also help with immune function, cellular growth, and help to prevent mood imbalances such as depression and seasonal affective disorder. Not getting enough vitamin D can lead to bone diseases like osteomalacia. Inadequate vitamin D can also increase your risk of heart disease, autoimmune diseases, certain cancers, and even death. The “official” minimum amount of vitamin D to strive for each day is merely 400-600 IU. Many experts think that this is not nearly enough for optimal health. To ensure you get adequate amounts of vitamin D, …

The Gut-Brain Connection: How To Feed Your Brain

If there was ever a call for “digestive health,” this is it! Yes, it’s true. Your gut is considered your “second brain.” There is no denying it anymore. And because of the new scientific discoveries about the vagus nerve, the enteric nervous system, and the amazing influence your gut microbes can have, it’s no wonder what you eat feeds not only your body but can directly affect your brain. I find it amazing (but not too surprising). What exactly is the “gut-brain connection”? Well, it’s very complex, and to be honest, we’re still learning lots about it! There seem to be multiple things working together.  Things like: The vagus nerve that links the gut directly to the brain; The “enteric nervous system” (A.K.A. “second brain) that helps the complex intricacies of digestion flow with little to no involvement from the actual brain; The massive amount of neurotransmitters produced by the gut; The huge part of the immune system that is in the gut, but can travel throughout the body; and, The interactions and messages sent by the gut microbes. This is complex. And amazing, if you ask me. I’ll briefly …

The Truth Behind Artificial Sweeteners

You probably know the negative health effects of eating too much sugar, especially “added sugars” like in soda/pop, candy, baked goods, and many commercially-available cereals, just to name a few.  Added sugar is hiding just about everywhere in the grocery store. Yes, ingesting refined sugar spikes your blood sugar and insulin, and increases your risk for a whole host of issues. A while ago, one of the food industry’s responses to the demand for lower-calorie foods that still taste great, was artificial sweeteners. The idea behind them is that you can still get the sweetness, without the calories; like when you have a “diet soda/pop” versus a regular one. Theoretically, this was going to help people maintain a healthy body weight, and hopefully not increase anyone’s risk of heart disease, diabetes, or obesity. But, it doesn’t always work out the way we think it will… Types of artificial sweeteners Sugar substitutes fall into several categories, but what they all have in common is that they have a sweet taste and fewer calories than plain sugar. Today we’ll specifically discuss “artificial sweeteners,” which are synthetic chemicals where a tiny bit tastes …